Monessen Shade Tree Commission

How was the Shade Tree Commission Created?

Monessen’s Shade Tree Commission was originally established in 1929. It was then defunct until being revived in 2018. The first members of the new iteration of the Shade Tree Commission were appointed in 2020. The Monessen Shade Tree Commission was established by Ordinance. You may view the Ordinance here.

Who does the Shade Tree Commission Comprise Of?

The Shade Tree Commission is made up of five members:

Marc Bellora, Chairman
Marsha Adams, Treasurer
Karen Cosner, Secretary
Jean Aiello
Mary Jo Smith

Why is there a Shade Tree Commission?

The Monessen Shade Tree Commission was created to further inform and foster sound urban forestry management practices by preserving and enhancing the City of Monessen’s existing and future tree planting and maintenance.

 

What is a Shade Tree?

A shade tree is a large tree whose primary role is to provide shade in the surrounding environment due to its spreading canopy and crown, offer natural protection to excessive temperature variations between day and night, and also protect the soil against erosion and evaporation while serving as an important component to stormwater management.

Why is Mulching Important?

Proper Mulching Techniques

An added safeguard for trees, mulching provides an insulated buffer from extreme temperatures. In addition, mulching retains water in keeping roots moist. Another key to mulching is to smother grass and weeds around your tree. Click here to Learn about Proper Mulching Techniques.

Useful Links

International Society of Arborculture
Arbor Day Foundation
TreesAreGood

Commonly Asked Questions

Q: What is a public right-of-way?

A: Right-of-Way is the term used to describe “right of passage” over another’s land. When the Commonwealth acquires land for transportation purposes, it is actually obtaining a “right of passage” over the land on which a public road ultimately will be built. It is a Constitutional right of the Commonwealth to acquire land for public purposes. The term used to describe this right is “Eminent Domain”. Eminent Domain states that it is the inherent right of the State to acquire land when it is needed for public use. Right-of-way includes the easement or land purchased by the City or a governmental entity, on which a roadway or public access point (sidewalks, etc.) are built, as well as the shoulder or berm, plus any additional area needed for infrastructure purposes such as drainage, slopes, etc. While the right-of-way is often 15  feet from the center of a roadway in Monessen, it may be wider in some areas, since it extends beyond the paved road and shoulders.

 

Trees at the Herman Mihalich Memorial River Launch Park